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Water cooling
#1
Is there much reason for water cooling systems anymore? I understand if you are overclocking your system you need to handle the heat. My system is all stock and seems to handle all games like a champ.
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#2
not if you have a gaming laptop....Angel
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#3
I haven't done a whole lot of overclocking, what I have the fan heat sinks seem to do just fine. Guess it depends what your end goal is Smile.

There are those cool heat sinks that are liquid cooled and all self contained. They are not the more advanced water cooling that people can do. I've installed these before in people's machines and seemed great.

Something like this: http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.as...6835106219
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#4
There is a couple good reasons for watercooling.

1) your system will run cooler than on aircooling alone. This is mostly due to the heat capacity of water and your ability to move that heat source outside your case. If you are overclocking this can be a huge benefit and the main reason people watercooled back in the day.

2) (and the most relevant) Watercooling can be quieter than aircooling. You still might get electrical hum and fan noise from a PSU or case fan but your CPU and/or GPU fan will be removed from the system and no longer will ramp up under load. This fan noise is replaced with whatever fans you have on the radiator and those don't need to spin much.

AIO watercooling is the most popular these days, mostly because it is cheap and... lets face it, consumers are cheap. However if you go DIY you can get all the benefits from AIO with more heat capacity and the ability to add more items to the water loop.

Oh and it can be made to look Amazing!

Downside. more work, more money, more maintenance, more weight, more risk
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#5
I am new here but I have some input on this. I have been water cooling PC's for over 5 years now. I have done a few of my own builds using custom loops, and a few for friends using AOI coolers.

Custom water loops

Cons:
Can be expensive. XSPC kits are a great place to start. I have parts from one because the kit was cheaper than buying the CPU block, radiator, and a new pump for my wife's computer and it came with everything you need for CPU watercooling. Hardline (if you chose to work with it) is VERY time consuming and tedious to work with. Water needs monitored for cloudiness, floating chunks, slime, etc. Laziness kills expensive water cooling parts. I learned that the hard way. There is also the possibility of leaks. Leak testing outside of the case reduces the chance to almost 0. But stuff like o-rings still fail every once in a while. I have never had something fail on me. Yet... No matter how careful you are, that is always a risk. Your tower becomes very heavy and more fragile if you have parts outside of the case. Doesn't fit in all cases well.

Pros:
Soft and hardline tubing look great if you take your time and plan it out. Case layout come into play here as well as your abilities. Keeps your parts very cool under heavy overclock's and loads. Sound level is dramatically reduced with lower temps. More consistent temps across ambient temps. Just plain fun to do and show off what you have done.

AIO Coolers
Cons:
Louder than custom loops when under heavy load. Higher temps than custom loops, but better than air. Cannot be expanded (Except for EK's setup that is about as much as a custom loop would end up being). Long hoses that cannot be cut down to length. Pump is on the waterblock so it looks bulky. Usually only has 1 or 2 120mm fans and does not have the option to add more radiators.

Pros:
Most AIO's are cheap. They work well for their design. Quieter than air. Cooler than most air setups. Perfect for small form factor builds that are becoming more and more relevant. Easy to work with. No water or maintenance required. Fit's in most cases.

I won't go into the pro's and cons of air cooling. You already know those. I used to have some pretty insane air cooling setups, but they were insanely loud as well. You don't have to have a loud air cooling setup if you are running stock speeds and don't mind being closer to the thermal capacities of the hardware. If you have more specific questions feel free to ask me and I will answer them if I can.
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